Author Topic: Call for Disc Golf Course Designers  (Read 38845 times)

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Dan Weinert

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Re: Call for Disc Golf Course Designers
« Reply #120 on: January 20, 2010, 10:19:51 AM »
I like the trapezoids, but maybe on a few of the more open holes the big circles make sense. The pads don't have to be uniform throughout the course, just look at Blue Valley! Maybe the case by case on  each hole would make a lot of sense.

I like trapezoids too...would like to turn some short end first on some hole, some long end first on some holes and maybe squeeze in some circles on Woodhenge.

Would insist on 16ft long...the pros I talked to at Cliff spotting for the Worlds this year loved them...A LOT!!!

Dan
For a good time: Lat- 39°25'8.92"N, Long- 94°33'18.52"W

Dan Weinert

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Re: Call for Disc Golf Course Designers
« Reply #121 on: January 20, 2010, 10:21:21 AM »
If you do not keep things uniform, it becomes very troublesome for those pouring the pads.  Anytime pads go in, there can be a great deal of problems due to the lack of disc golf knowledge of the workers.  Ask Dirk.  When they start pouring and forming problems can arise.  Some folks from the club will need to be there to avoid any problems.  I have a pad a Young park that is off by a couple feet, even though it was marked with flags near the pad and then marked wiht flags 50 feet in front of the pad to help line it out. 

Keep it simple or plan on being there for every pad poured.


Under control sir...it's how I roll!

Dan  ;D
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Schoen-hopper

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Re: Call for Disc Golf Course Designers
« Reply #122 on: January 20, 2010, 11:10:38 AM »
If you do not keep things uniform, it becomes very troublesome for those pouring the pads.  Anytime pads go in, there can be a great deal of problems due to the lack of disc golf knowledge of the workers.  Ask Dirk.  When they start pouring and forming problems can arise.  Some folks from the club will need to be there to avoid any problems.  I have a pad a Young park that is off by a couple feet, even though it was marked with flags near the pad and then marked wiht flags 50 feet in front of the pad to help line it out. 

Keep it simple or plan on being there for every pad poured.


Other problems can come up too.   We had some of our pads in Oak Park poured too high off the ground.  Hard to run up & follow through and don't look as good as those flush within an inch of the ground.  And sometimes I've seen pads that are finished too slick.  The heavier the broom finish, the better.  I've seen some pads that look like they were cast and brought to the course (Newton).  They aren't pretty, but have great traction!

john theiss

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Re: Call for Disc Golf Course Designers
« Reply #123 on: January 20, 2010, 12:08:13 PM »
Mike S.H. has a great point.  If you want your course to have the nice touches, the pads need to be dug out with a skid and be flush to the ground.  Then after the pads are poured, they come back and do the dirt work around the pads giving you nice flat run up surfaces.  Think about all of the courses you play where you or others trip over the pads, whether throwing or not.  Plus,you want to be able to allow the mowers access to drive right over the pads and cut. 

The operator of the skid can get confused with all different shapes and dimensions so you have to make it as easy as possible for them.  Here is a tip: take flags and stake them in  30-40 feet in front of the pads.  this will give the skid operator a place to line up the machine. I am assuming some tees will require major dirt work to level it off.  By the time of dropping a bunch of dirt, all the old flags will be ran over, lost and destroyed.   By placing the flags out in front, it gives the skid operator a point of reference.  He will appreciate little tips like that becuase he does not understand where the fairway is, or where the basket is.  After you get the dirt work done, i might even be helpful to do the same idea with flags marking 30-40 feet in front of the tee boxes in case someone can't be  present.  I was not always able to be around when 35 pads were poured at Young park and mistakes get made. 

otter

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Re: Call for Disc Golf Course Designers
« Reply #124 on: January 20, 2010, 12:29:48 PM »
I realize that concrete cracks...it's just a fact of life.  But, how thick must a concrete teepad be to withstand the weight of P&R mowers?  Would guess them to weigh in at 1700-2000+ lbs...

 
Enshrine hallucinations...PULL!!

twoDornottwoD

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Re: Call for Disc Golf Course Designers
« Reply #125 on: January 20, 2010, 11:25:12 PM »
most sidewalks are built 2".  Runways at airports are usually closer to 12".  i would think a happy medium would be sufficient
Drew D Neitzel

Keizer

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Re: Call for Disc Golf Course Designers
« Reply #126 on: January 21, 2010, 12:03:23 AM »
most sidewalks are built 2".  Runways at airports are usually closer to 12".  i would think a happy medium would be sufficient

The pad thicknesses at Cliff vary a bit, but I would guess that none are thicker than 5". I'd put the average at just over 4".

Penis.

Tom

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Re: Call for Disc Golf Course Designers
« Reply #127 on: January 21, 2010, 06:33:36 AM »
most sidewalks are built 2".  Runways at airports are usually closer to 12".  i would think a happy medium would be sufficient


2" for sidewalks and 12" for runways? Maybe for radio controlled planes.

I spent 2 years as the resident engineer on a boulevard (Quindaro)re-construction in KCK. The standards we used were:
-for residental sidewalks 4" thick non-reinforced 3000 lb air entrained concrete
-for commercial sidewalks 5" thick 6x6-4.0x4.0 welded wire fabric reinforced 3000 lb air entrained concrete

I spent 3 years as the resident engineer on an Air Force base aircraft apron re-constructionh project. The concrete there was:
-for general aircraft taxi and parking 18" non-reinforced 4000 lb air entrained concrete on 12" structural sub-base
-for areas where transports such as the C5 or bombers such as the B1 or B52 would taxi and park 24" non-reinforced 4000 lb air entrained concrete on 18" structural sub-base
-the runways were 24" thick but the touchdown zones at each end were 36" thick

If you use 2x6 lumber for forms it will give you roughly 4 1/2" to 5 1/2" thickness. That thickness with some 6x6-W4.0xW4.0 welded wire fabric and 4000 pound air entrained concrete will give you pads that will last a very long time. Ideally the ground is fairly level where the pad is being built, but the thing to do is make sure the top of the forms are aproximnately 1 1/2" higher than the highest spot of ground all around the box out 5 feet or so. This prevents washover of silt later.
I would suggest if the corps is going to hire this done, that one of the course designers is there during excavation and form setting to ensure correect alignment. You can simply paint on the ground the outline you want for the box and the skid loader operator can use that to do the cut. Then, when the forms are being set, be there and make sure they get them lined up right.
If you have questions about concrete and tees, I'll be glad to help.

Dan Weinert

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Re: Call for Disc Golf Course Designers
« Reply #128 on: January 21, 2010, 04:47:18 PM »
Traezoids are a bit tougher to figure volume for...I did not want to crack open my old geometry book so I asked Tom Butler to calculate the amount of concrete needed for the following-

16ft long trapeziod, 8ft backs, 4ft fronts in both 3.5" and 5.5" thick-


12ft long trapeziod, 8ft backs, 4ft fronts in both 3.5" and 5.5" thick-


He also threw in a cross section showing proper elevation-


AWESOME JOB TOM!!!! Thank you!!!
« Last Edit: January 21, 2010, 05:08:37 PM by Lefty »
For a good time: Lat- 39°25'8.92"N, Long- 94°33'18.52"W

coops

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Re: Call for Disc Golf Course Designers
« Reply #129 on: January 21, 2010, 04:56:27 PM »
Very nice

Dan Weinert

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Re: Call for Disc Golf Course Designers
« Reply #130 on: January 21, 2010, 05:18:46 PM »
Quote
And sometimes I've seen pads that are finished too slick.  The heavier the broom finish, the better.

I have used the regular push broom on many projects but will use the astroturf method on these babies...the guys I have chatted with says it gives an awesome surface...plenty of traction. (pics stolen from Innova's Web site)

For a good time: Lat- 39°25'8.92"N, Long- 94°33'18.52"W

Keizer

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Re: Call for Disc Golf Course Designers
« Reply #131 on: January 21, 2010, 06:24:59 PM »
For durability/cost purposes, I'd vote for the 12' pads at 5-1/2" thick. I've seen very few players actually take full advantage of the 16' pads at Cliff. Of course, you could go 12' on most holes and 16' on any crazy long holes there might be.

Tom

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Re: Call for Disc Golf Course Designers
« Reply #132 on: January 22, 2010, 07:32:59 AM »
.....or they could be 14' long trapezoids, 5" thick. 

Dan Weinert

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Re: Call for Disc Golf Course Designers
« Reply #133 on: January 22, 2010, 07:44:19 AM »
.....or they could be 28' long trapezoids, 2.5" thick.

KCI could rent them out as backup runways!

Dan  ;D
For a good time: Lat- 39°25'8.92"N, Long- 94°33'18.52"W

Keizer

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Re: Call for Disc Golf Course Designers
« Reply #134 on: January 22, 2010, 08:39:49 AM »
Now you're just being silly, Chief.

In that picture with the "astro turf", is that really what that it is? It looks more like one of those doormats with the brushy texture for wiping off muddy shoes.