Author Topic: Zoysa  (Read 354 times)

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Steve the Quiz Berry

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Zoysa
« on: June 18, 2014, 03:04:01 PM »
I was wondering?

Has anyone ever seen, or tried laying a ...say a 40 foot perimeter of zoysa sod around a basket location.
Forming a green of course, that does not,  necessarily, have to be in a circle.
Any shape,  maybe even around tree's.
Might solve mud issues on the green.

otter

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Re: Zoysa
« Reply #1 on: June 18, 2014, 10:51:43 PM »
Zoysia will grow well only in full sun.  It is very invasive and will spread; but once again, only in full sun. 
Zoysia is one of the first turf types to turn brown/go dormant in the Fall as well as one of the last to green-up in the Spring.
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The Nailer™

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Re: Zoysa
« Reply #2 on: June 19, 2014, 04:18:41 PM »
I prefer dirt.
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Steve the Quiz Berry

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Re: Zoysa
« Reply #3 on: June 19, 2014, 07:41:34 PM »
 ::)  Dirt...that reminds me to much of horse shoes
I prefer dirt.

Jake B

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Re: Zoysa
« Reply #4 on: June 23, 2014, 12:43:16 PM »
I've wondered whether some type of creeping grass like Zoysa would grow on Waterworks hole 6 fairway. I read that it has origins in erosion control. I don't think it won't in the shade, just not as well. I'm sure there's a variety that will grow in shade better. We need to do something about the bare spots around the city. Many trees have died and are continuing to die off due to the toll erosion has on them.

D Craft

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Re: Zoysa
« Reply #5 on: June 27, 2014, 08:15:02 AM »
Of course one of the problems is that it goes dormant very early and is only green for about 3-5 months of the year.  When in doubt plant native.  Buffalo.  Otherwise fescue is the economical alternative.
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robm

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Re: Zoysa
« Reply #6 on: June 27, 2014, 08:49:19 AM »
I agree that we need some heavy duty grass on our courses.  I'm not a grass guy, herbal or otherwise.  I do tend to like native grasses as introduced species prove to be a bad idea down the road.  However, I'm not too concerned if something goes dormant as long as it doesn't go dead.  I'd rather have dormant brown grass then packed dirt and bare roots leading to dead trees.

I do think this is something that as a club we should put some finances towards
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otter

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Re: Zoysa
« Reply #7 on: June 27, 2014, 09:28:02 AM »
Seeding is best accomplished in Sept (mostly due to cooler nighttime temps)...though w/o adequate AND regular moisture, it becomes a crapshoot.  Finding a way to have the seed covered, or better yet tilled/verticut/aerated in, will help ensure that it is not just birdfood. 

One can also overseed in Feb/Mar in hopes that when the soil warms up enough - it will germinate and take hold before our typical mid/late-Spring heat will challenge it.
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robm

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Re: Zoysa
« Reply #8 on: June 27, 2014, 09:45:16 AM »
for particularly bad basket areas, the area could be prepped, seeded and fenced off with snow fencing to give it a chance to grow.
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jack

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Re: Zoysa
« Reply #9 on: June 27, 2014, 10:11:19 AM »
you will never get basket areas to grow grass on heavily used courses unless you move the pins often......tilling and sod are really the best options.  I tried tilling and seeding for the past 3 years in my own yard, finally broke down and tilled and sod, and yard looks much better now....the issue in our courses is that we use them frequently and it causes soil compaction http://www.extension.umn.edu/agriculture/Tillage/soil-compaction/index.html and we harm the ground and truly do prevent it from being able to get the nutrients it needs to flourish.....why we chip and mulch so much around the baskets and the teeing areas, those are places that everyone walks by all the time.....
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Steve the Quiz Berry

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Re: Zoysa
« Reply #10 on: June 27, 2014, 10:21:00 AM »
 ::) When I was building stick ball course's

We used a lot of zoyza sod around pothole bunkers
For collers around the green
Around drain openings
Sometimes wash out areas

Fairwars bluegrass
Rough fescue, or some other native grass
Typically we installed a lot of drain tile to prevent washouts
As far as seeding, light straw on top will hold moisture, and help keep some from birds
But then again, sprinkler systems were install

john theiss

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Re: Zoysa
« Reply #11 on: June 27, 2014, 10:31:56 AM »
k 31 fescue is tough stuff.  many parks use that due to its durability.  a lot of farmers use that as well if then are not growing higher nutrient feed ie alfalfa.   however, it does not spread out and in bare spots you will see big clumps of it.  i use k 31 in my yard and like it and wish it would take over the blue grass.

Steve the Quiz Berry

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Re: Zoysa
« Reply #12 on: June 27, 2014, 10:43:09 AM »
 ;) As far as disc golf greens are concerned
Putting in artificial greens would be the way to go.
Even shows how to do it online
And you can make them in any shape or form, or size
Branson'sTree house course is an example, but they don't have to be that huge.
It would be a top of line looking course
People might even pay.
Just a few more ideals
::) When I was building stick ball course's

We used a lot of zoyza sod around pothole bunkers
For collers around the green
Around drain openings
Sometimes wash out areas

Fairwars bluegrass
Rough fescue, or some other native grass
Typically we installed a lot of drain tile to prevent washouts
As far as seeding, light straw on top will hold moisture, and help keep some from birds
But then again, sprinkler systems were install