Author Topic: Disc shapes and weights  (Read 1566 times)

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Crickey

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Disc shapes and weights
« on: December 23, 2007, 10:30:15 AM »
What would be good disc shapes and weights for low strength beginners? The promise of "long straight drivers" by the manufacturers is anything but for a novice. Any suggestions?

Schoen-hopper

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Re: Disc shapes and weights
« Reply #1 on: December 23, 2007, 05:57:23 PM »
It is debatable, but I would recommend begginers to stay clear of 150 class discs.  They only go farther with a tailwind and thats if the shot is thrown perfectly (a pro type shot, not novice).  They lack in control much more than they help in distance.  In fact, throwing these could impare a players progress as the correct release is never learned.

I would recommend something like a 170 Roadrunner for a driver and a 170+ mid range disc like a roc or perhaps even more understable and of course a max weight putter.  Throw the mid range and putter whenever possible.  They are the straightest discs with the least amount of fade.

Much more important than disc selection is technique.  I throw with a ton of hyzer and use understable discs, but I can still get plenty of distance.  The type of disc you should use depends on how much hyzer angle you are releasing with.  The part of the throw that many begginers get wrong that should be corrected is that they release the disc with a nose up attitude.  This causes the disc to fly up and then fade out without acheiving the correct flight or distance of the shot.

Everyone has their own throw though.  I have seen beginners turning discs over (badly, and usually with the two finger throw) that I would never even think of turning over.  It's hard to know exactly what advice to give without seeing, or at least hearing, what could use improvement with the throw.

kohjahk

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Re: Disc shapes and weights
« Reply #2 on: December 24, 2007, 09:27:32 AM »
I agree with the Schoenhopper on avoiding the 150 class discs.  170's plus.  When you learn to snap your disc enough to generate enough spin to naturally turn them over you will start to improve your game.  As far as what discs I recommend that you keep a putter, a roc and two different class drivers, one close to the stable rating and one higher in the overstable rating.  For stable I'd say pick up a beast or valkyrie.  For overstable pick up a Pro Wraith or a CE Starfire.

Rick Rothstein

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Re: Disc shapes and weights
« Reply #3 on: December 24, 2007, 11:57:28 AM »
What would be good disc shapes and weights for low strength beginners? The promise of "long straight drivers" by the manufacturers is anything but for a novice. Any suggestions?

First of all, please take any advice you receive in disc golf, especially on line, with skepticism, including my answer here. We offer advice at Disc Golf World to people new to the game, and there are more new people all the time.  Before making any recommendations, we first ask about what discs the person is throwing and how they fly. We also determine which hand the player uses to throw and if they are throwing predominately backhands or forehands. The physique and gender of a new player also influences the advice we offer. Sooo, Crickey, let us know what discs you have tried and how you throw them. Generally speaking, it is better to learn to throw with a putt and approach or midrange discs. As to the shape of a disc, keep it round.

Rick

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Mike Penney

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Re: Disc shapes and weights
« Reply #4 on: December 24, 2007, 09:39:16 PM »
i heard the square ones go further........ ;D
Mike Penney

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Re: Disc shapes and weights
« Reply #5 on: December 25, 2007, 06:50:22 PM »
There's a lot of differing philosophies on driver selection for those starting out, but I do recommend learning to throw your putters and midranges well.  Those will teach you the most about reducing torque on the disc, as well as generating spin (or snap), which is how big distance is archived.  A 170ish Roc or Buzz would be a good disc, as well as a 170+ putter (wizard, aviar, challenger, rhyno, magnet...whatever feels good in your hand) would be great starting discs.

While you could go with a distance driver like a valkyrie or a beast or wraith, you may want to start out with a fairway driver like a Gazelle, Cyclone, or Sabre (which are pretty much the same disc from the 3 major manufacturers).  These particular drivers are quite versatile, allowing you to learn to work a variety of angles (both hyzer and anhyzer) and lines (both high and low) without the need to buy too many discs.  The thing with the high speed drivers is that you need a good amount of arm speed and snap with minimal torque to get the desired lines, which is a tough trifecta to put together when you're starting.  Also, the slower fairway drivers are less nose sensitive, so you're less prone to have throws go all over the place.  Personally, when it comes to weight, I tend to recommend something in the 168 range for starting out, because it teach you to snap the disc without torquing it over, as a lot of beginners do because they're throwing discs that are too heavy for their technique.

It might be worth your time to check out http://www.discgolfreview.com, read though the articles, and read through the information on their forums.  While there's a lot (and I mean a lot) of crap to wade though there, I have found some amazingly insightful information into good technique.

Schoen-hopper

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Re: Disc shapes and weights
« Reply #6 on: December 26, 2007, 09:04:35 PM »
Now there's some good advice!