Author Topic: Call for Disc Golf Course Designers  (Read 16440 times)

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Timko

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Re: Call for Disc Golf Course Designers
« Reply #90 on: January 16, 2010, 06:37:42 PM »
There are Titans on both the Ozark Mountain courses in Vichy.  They catch fine, and have a very minimalist look to them.  I've never been a big fan of the Innova chastity belt, but the Innova basket catches more spin type putts than an Mach III.

John Chapman

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Re: Call for Disc Golf Course Designers
« Reply #91 on: January 17, 2010, 02:50:23 PM »
There are Titans on both the Ozark Mountain courses in Vichy.  They catch fine, and have a very minimalist look to them.  I've never been a big fan of the Innova chastity belt, but the Innova basket catches more spin type putts than an Mach III.



I agree.  Both the Titan and the DISCatcher catch better than the Mach III.  DISCatchers already in place have had a history of rusting early. although I know that Innova was aware of the issue, and was supposedly trying to fix it with the newer ones.
Missouri....our state animal is sterile, our state rock is lead, and we elected a dead guy to the U.S. Senate.  Of course, he was the best candidate.

Dan Weinert

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Re: Call for Disc Golf Course Designers
« Reply #92 on: January 17, 2010, 03:19:27 PM »
Here are photos of four possible baskets...

Am I missing anything?

DGA Mach III


Disc King Kingpin (DU Baskets)


Gateway Titan


Innova Discatcher


Seems like thay all have pro and cons...I am developing a list now to sort through all the clutter and try to see if one makes more sense then the others.

PS- We could also go this route...





« Last Edit: January 17, 2010, 03:34:02 PM by Lefty »
For a good time: Lat- 3925'8.92"N, Long- 9433'18.52"W

Timko

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Re: Call for Disc Golf Course Designers
« Reply #93 on: January 17, 2010, 04:05:39 PM »
There's also a basket made by Missouri native Disc Golf Monkey called the Monkey Trap.  They look nice, and they're galvanized.


dickthediscparker

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Re: Call for Disc Golf Course Designers
« Reply #94 on: January 17, 2010, 05:25:41 PM »
I vote for Mach III but I dont' care really either way.  As long as it isn't that funky cresent moon shaped POS. 

I have heard that Cubby has invented a basket... out of lattice!
..sS{Dick Parker}Zz...
Disc Golf Course Designer
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Dan Weinert

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Re: Call for Disc Golf Course Designers
« Reply #95 on: January 17, 2010, 06:02:47 PM »
Quote
FYI circular pads lend the most creativity for artistic drives...

Quote
Or, Dick's suggestion from a while back- 10 foot diameter circles...

I am trying to buy into the concept of 10' diameter pads but the extra work in excavation and framing concern me...a lot.

Anybody want to come up with some solutions for both of those concerns?

Dan  8)
« Last Edit: January 17, 2010, 06:05:50 PM by Lefty »
For a good time: Lat- 3925'8.92"N, Long- 9433'18.52"W

coops

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Re: Call for Disc Golf Course Designers
« Reply #96 on: January 17, 2010, 08:22:34 PM »
I am glad that Tom and Cooper have no problem with buying products made in China.  Maybe you guys can order the baskets off Wal-Mart.com.   I like buying made in USA to keep Americans working.  If you can make a putt in a discatcher then you should be able to make a putt in any basket.  Quit buying crap made in China if you can help it.  Tom aren't you an engineer, maybe you can move to Shanghai and play disc golf, or Korea.  Better put a car alarm on Gus.

Unfortunately walmart.com does not sell disc golf baskets.

Dan Weinert

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Re: Call for Disc Golf Course Designers
« Reply #97 on: January 17, 2010, 08:26:56 PM »
I am glad that Tom and Cooper have no problem with buying products made in China.  Maybe you guys can order the baskets off Wal-Mart.com.   I like buying made in USA to keep Americans working.  If you can make a putt in a discatcher then you should be able to make a putt in any basket.  Quit buying crap made in China if you can help it.  Tom aren't you an engineer, maybe you can move to Shanghai and play disc golf, or Korea.  Better put a car alarm on Gus.

I'd still like to see written proof of the 'Made in China" claim.

Does that exist MOSPARKY? Not doubting your word sir...just like to see it in writing!

Dan
For a good time: Lat- 3925'8.92"N, Long- 9433'18.52"W

coops

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Re: Call for Disc Golf Course Designers
« Reply #98 on: January 17, 2010, 08:38:15 PM »
I have two points... and the first is taken by Lefty Dan as I am writing this... how does everyone know that they are Chinese made instead of American made. I've looked for it and still haven't found it. And the second is this, http://archives.chicagotribune.com/2009/apr/07/business/chi-tue-made-in-usa-0407-apr07. Not saying this is a definitive answer about whether you should or should not buy American 100% of the time, but it does have some interesting points made in it. And, think about this, Innova is an American Company which, if it does produce its baskets in China does so for a reason, i.e. to production costs which allows them to keep their products competitive with other companies which allows us as disc golfers to increase our buying power and thus further support the American economy by buying more stuff.
The global economy isn't a black and white subject and is more complex than most if not all of us can fully understand and I think it is foolish for us to base our decisions about the best course equipment on something so confusing. Undoubtedly if Innova does produce baskets in China they are doing it for a reason such as keeping disc prices low or being able to pay the people who work to produce the discs in Rancho Cucamonga.
I think we should get the main point of this thread back on topic and focus on what we can do to make this one of the best disc golfing destinations in the area if not the world and the way that we will do that is by consciously deciding to focus on productive thoughts such as design, choosing the best equipment, tee shape and size, and appropriate shock 'n' awe features for the course so that we can get more people hooked on disc golf. (And then they can help us support the economy more by buying countless discs from DGA, Innova, Discraft, Gateway, and all of the other great American disc manufacturers.)


So, new idea up for debate, how close is too close for a basket to be to OB? My personal opinion, 20 ft min and 30 ft preferable. Discuss...

Schoen-hopper

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Re: Call for Disc Golf Course Designers
« Reply #99 on: January 17, 2010, 11:23:01 PM »
I like holes where the OB narrows on one or both sides of the fairway as it gets closer to the green.  The longer you know, the more the need for accuracy.  But I think you have to keep the OB at a reasonable distance from the basket.  Shots that land OB should be the result of a poor decision, a poor execution, or both.  It shouldn't be left to "luck" or chance, such as an OB line too close to trees on a main fairway route, or a basket that spits a putt that rolls OB.  OB is generally the lowest point, like a road or a pond.  So this can increase the chance that shots will land there and more distance should be given for close to the basket situations the lower it is from the basket.  If OB is used next to a basket, I would think you would put it somewhere where an advanced player might make the putt half the time.  Maybe around 35'.  Then pros can limit the amount the OB punishes them, but it still takes a good shot.  For OB near the edges of the fairway, a 50/50% chance of getting up & down makes sense as well.  For OB around the green, you almost always see it behind the basket.  If a player knows they can make the putt from the OB line, they can use this as insurance instead of having to face a tough decision.  I think that having OB in front is more interesting.  Then a player has to decide to lay up or go for it on the drive or approach.  Then the player who runs at the shot and runs too far past has to again make a decision because if they go past this time they'll be OB and looking at a big number.  In the end, I think it is situational.  On an open flat course, some guidelines may work pretty well.  But in more unique situations, some exceptions might actually add some flavor.
« Last Edit: January 17, 2010, 11:27:38 PM by Schoen-hopper »

Keizer

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Re: Call for Disc Golf Course Designers
« Reply #100 on: January 18, 2010, 07:00:23 AM »
I have two points... and the first is taken by Lefty Dan as I am writing this... how does everyone know that they are Chinese made instead of American made. I've looked for it and still haven't found it. And the second is this, http://archives.chicagotribune.com/2009/apr/07/business/chi-tue-made-in-usa-0407-apr07. Not saying this is a definitive answer about whether you should or should not buy American 100% of the time, but it does have some interesting points made in it.


It's written by some Asian %$#@er with an anti-American agenda. And Fritz Henderson had to say what he said because of political-correctness. Truth is, the more popular Asian products have become in this country, the worse our economy and unemployment situation has gotten. You don't have to watch the news or read articles to see that. The Jap and Korean auto companies have done a wonderful job convincing stupid Americans that buying their products doesn't hurt American jobs. "Look! It's built right here!", or whatever they say. What they don't tell you is that it's not built here, it's assembled here using fewer employees at a lesser hourly wage.

I don't get all into the "WHAAA 9/11 NEVR FORGT AMERICA %$#@ YEAH!" stuff, but seriously, look at what the rest of the world, especially the Asian countries, did to help us out after 9/11. It wasn't much. Then keep telling yourself it's a "global economy". That's a cop-out if I ever heard one. Ain't nobody gonna help your ass besides your fellow countrymen, and even that's not guaranteed if all the folks driving foreign cars is any indication.

What I'm saying here is that Smithville ought to have Mach III baskets.

MOSPARKY

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Re: Call for Disc Golf Course Designers
« Reply #101 on: January 18, 2010, 07:14:29 AM »
Amen Keiser, I started new thread so designers wouldn't get mad.  Even though baskets are part of the design.  Good luck to all designers on the project.  Although I don't see much designer talk on this thread.

coops

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Re: Call for Disc Golf Course Designers
« Reply #102 on: January 18, 2010, 08:41:34 AM »
I like holes where the OB narrows on one or both sides of the fairway as it gets closer to the green.  The longer you know, the more the need for accuracy.  But I think you have to keep the OB at a reasonable distance from the basket.  Shots that land OB should be the result of a poor decision, a poor execution, or both.  It shouldn't be left to "luck" or chance, such as an OB line too close to trees on a main fairway route, or a basket that spits a putt that rolls OB.  OB is generally the lowest point, like a road or a pond.  So this can increase the chance that shots will land there and more distance should be given for close to the basket situations the lower it is from the basket.  If OB is used next to a basket, I would think you would put it somewhere where an advanced player might make the putt half the time.  Maybe around 35'.  Then pros can limit the amount the OB punishes them, but it still takes a good shot.  For OB near the edges of the fairway, a 50/50% chance of getting up & down makes sense as well.  For OB around the green, you almost always see it behind the basket.  If a player knows they can make the putt from the OB line, they can use this as insurance instead of having to face a tough decision.  I think that having OB in front is more interesting.  Then a player has to decide to lay up or go for it on the drive or approach.  Then the player who runs at the shot and runs too far past has to again make a decision because if they go past this time they'll be OB and looking at a big number.  In the end, I think it is situational.  On an open flat course, some guidelines may work pretty well.  But in more unique situations, some exceptions might actually add some flavor.

I agree with most of what you are saying here, but I think I need to clarify my point a little bit. I think OB should be at the closets 20ft ONLY when it isn't too expansive around the pin. For example, if there is a little pond 20-25 ft away from the pin but it is only towards the left edge of the green I would expect players to account for the type of OB and to either challenge the pin and take the risk or play it safer out towards the right and see if they can still get close enough for the bird. I guess the main point of questioning OB is to question whether it is fair for the player throwing good shots and one of the main thoughts that comes out of that is that you can still throw a good shot and land OB if you didn't take the OB into consideration, but then did you really make a good shot?

Can anybody think of a good way to have a bunch of artificial OB without rope or paint, both of which are time consuming and expensive? (I know roads and water and paths and whatnot, I'm saying where that isn't available.)

Dan Weinert

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Re: Call for Disc Golf Course Designers
« Reply #103 on: January 18, 2010, 09:22:39 AM »
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Can anybody think of a good way to have a bunch of artificial OB without rope or paint, both of which are time consuming and expensive? (I know roads and water and paths and whatnot, I'm saying where that isn't available.)

Seems to me we use landscaping to fit in with the natural look of the park. Many of the native grasses, when planted in thin strips would make excellent OB's.

Dan
For a good time: Lat- 3925'8.92"N, Long- 9433'18.52"W

coops

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Re: Call for Disc Golf Course Designers
« Reply #104 on: January 18, 2010, 09:30:11 AM »
Yeah, I like that idea and have incorporated it into a couple of my holes (for the already in place natural tall grass). One would still have to paint or put up some rope for a big enough tournament and there is the problem of it being harder to find your disc in tall grass than if it just passes over a road. But good thinking, definitely a step in the right direction. (Do you know if the parks department is willing to plant more grass?)