Author Topic: Tee Signs  (Read 1585 times)

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Mike Penney

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Tee Signs
« on: November 17, 2005, 03:57:37 PM »
Which signs do you prefer?
Mike Penney

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Tee Signs
« Reply #1 on: November 17, 2005, 11:49:48 PM »
You going to put some signs in?
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Twister66

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Tee Signs
« Reply #2 on: November 18, 2005, 07:53:27 PM »
I think that the pictures signs look cool, but the overhead graphics are much more useful, especially if you have never played a course before (isn’t that who truly uses the signs).  The picture depicts only one time of year while the hole may look completely different depending on the season, and may not correctly associate a dogleg or other obstacle between the pad and the pin.   Also, I am not sure how well the pictures age. If the elements are allowed to penetrate the laminate the picture gets “wavy” and isn’t as useful.  

What about the cost? Are they similar?  I would think that a replacement for a damaged or vandalized schematic such as Rosedale’s would be easier to replace.

I am curious about what people think are the best examples of signage, across the spectrum, and not limited to the two aforementioned types on any course they have played.  This could include wishful thinking if cost were of no consideration.

In my limited experience, the signs in Des Moines at Walnut Ridge and Ewing Park which, as I recall, are similar to the thick textured plastic associated with ball golf signage are very useful and aesthetically pleasing. My guess is that these are very expensive to provide for every hole, and could considerably raise the cost due to the need to include signs at each pad where more than one pad exists per hole.  

I believe that it is Oak Park in Wichita that has the hole depictions painted on the tee pads, and include an arrow pointing toward the next tee.   These are great because you don’t have to extrapolate the information horizontally after looking at a vertical sign.  I think the tee pads are coated with something to protect the paint on the pad. Those may be more susceptible to vandalism, but don’t require any poles which looks nice.

This is just some random (rambling) thoughts about signs on my part.  This was obviously not meant to offend those who are enamored of the picture signs nor is it to suggest the club spend exorbitant sums on new signage.
Jim Sherwood

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Tee Signs
« Reply #3 on: November 21, 2005, 08:13:02 PM »
The signs in Emporia, KS have both a schematic and a larger superimposed picture.  Best signs I have seen.

It's hard to make a good, useful top drawing of a hole.  When this is done in the correct porportion, including distances and such, it is very useful.  I espescially like the colored dots for different pin locations.

MikeTeachKC

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Signs
« Reply #4 on: November 23, 2005, 07:05:49 AM »
I like the signs with the overhead on them.  The pictures are cool, but as mentioned already, they don't give you an accurate "view" of the hole.  With an overhead schematic, anyone can plan their shot if they know where the basket is.

mister pfister

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Cool Signage...
« Reply #5 on: November 23, 2005, 07:29:44 AM »
...Mike Weinbrecht at 'Creative Signs' in Topeka (785-233-8000, mwcreativesigns@aol.com) designed some really cool signs for his Prairie Meadows course. I have some pics (somewhere) that I will forward. They are simple, colorful and have all the information one needs to throw the hole. He also designed some neat wind vane-type signs for the baskets, as well as signs leading one to the next hole. Worth a look for sure, and it helps to have a 'disc golf' guy make the signs anyway. Super nice guy too! I'm sure he will be very competitive in pricing for the club.