Author Topic: Disc Golf IQ  (Read 2767 times)

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Loomis

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Re: Disc Golf IQ
« Reply #15 on: April 09, 2013, 01:26:58 PM »
So now that we have focused in on mental discipline; perhaps we could talk about the techniques that have made the most impact on their game. For me, I practice putting with my eyes closed. I also throw slower to maintain more control over the disc. I think it helps me shape shots. And the best technique advice I have ever been given is remembering to keep my muscles loose.

KCVinnie

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Re: Disc Golf IQ
« Reply #16 on: April 09, 2013, 01:46:08 PM »
I agree with Mike and Jordan's assessment, practice YOUR technique and have confidence in what YOU do.

As far as technique I use:
1. Deep breath before putting
2. Smile and act like I am at home practicing my putt with my daughter.
3. Direct all energy to one chain link, let it go, and don't worry about the results.

No wind or with the wind, I picture dropping it in the basket like a free throw.

Against wind, I remember what Jake told me, put a little spin on it.

One video that I like is Paul McBeth's video in his apartment.  He taped the chains together and putted from about 30 ft.  What I thought was interesting is how he hardly needs the chains or even the pole.  He was just dropping them right into the basket.
Vince
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five2loves42

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Re: Disc Golf IQ
« Reply #17 on: April 09, 2013, 01:47:01 PM »
I just changed putters again to the MERCY (as well as a bunch of other plastic) and then played the Monkey Island... I shot an 868 rated round... 8... 6.... 8. Came in DFL. I have technique and confidence, but not so much with the new plastic. Yet.

I have the GBO this weekend and I have to figure out what I am going to do; stick with familiar plastic or go with the new stuff.

Sounds like Tiger with Nike :)
Even a bad day on the disc-golf course beats ANY day at work! -
Tom V.

jhinck2

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Re: Disc Golf IQ
« Reply #18 on: April 09, 2013, 01:51:36 PM »
I just changed putters again to the MERCY (as well as a bunch of other plastic) and then played the Monkey Island... I shot an 868 rated round... 8... 6.... 8. Came in DFL. I have technique and confidence, but not so much with the new plastic. Yet.

I have the GBO this weekend and I have to figure out what I am going to do; stick with familiar plastic or go with the new stuff.

Sounds like Tiger with Nike :)

Believe you mean Rory
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Loomis

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Re: Disc Golf IQ
« Reply #19 on: April 09, 2013, 01:55:46 PM »
The best gurus of golf so far have been Pete Cashen and CD.

five2loves42

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Re: Disc Golf IQ
« Reply #20 on: April 09, 2013, 02:04:05 PM »
I just changed putters again to the MERCY (as well as a bunch of other plastic) and then played the Monkey Island... I shot an 868 rated round... 8... 6.... 8. Came in DFL. I have technique and confidence, but not so much with the new plastic. Yet.

I have the GBO this weekend and I have to figure out what I am going to do; stick with familiar plastic or go with the new stuff.

Sounds like Tiger with Nike :)

Believe you mean Rory

Yeah, he is their latest victim.
Even a bad day on the disc-golf course beats ANY day at work! -
Tom V.

coops

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Re: Disc Golf IQ
« Reply #21 on: April 09, 2013, 02:22:07 PM »
I believe Hinck has it right when it comes to having confidence in your own technique. There's so many different styles if you watch the pros. Different grip, different speed of run-up, different reach-back, different follow-through. On putts: different grip, different stance, different loft, different spin, etc. I think people do what works for them and what feels natural and it translates to better results for some than for most others. I'm in the most others boat. ;D

Style is about how it makes sense to you to get the disc in the basket, too. I forced myself for almost two years to be a pitch putter when spinning makes the most sense to me. It worked a bit but, especially on long-mid range putts all it was doing was leaving me close to the basket. Since switching styles back I've found a lot more peace when I'm putting. It hasn't been as successful yet but it feels like it is just getting going and is going to be a great change. Moral of the story: putt how you 'think' you should putt. If you gotta jam it in there, do that. If you can lob it to the moon and have it drop in like Tank does, then do that.

sportwood

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Re: Disc Golf IQ
« Reply #22 on: April 09, 2013, 02:24:24 PM »
Ok...  A Loomis size response for a Loomis thread.

IMO, practice is important but perfect practice makes perfect.  It is experience that makes you better.  The difference is experience is experiencing doing it wrong enough times until you experience doing it right while practice is reinforcing those experiences where you did it right.

I have watched all kinds of videos and they have shown me a lot of other people’s experience.  There are also fundamental things that are consistent throughout most techniques and when I watch a video of myself I can compare technique against various others and see obvious mistakes.  That being said I will say that when I got confidence in my technique (just recently) is when I have seen the most improvement.  This came on the tail of a long frustrating streak where i finally thought screw it I am just going to have fun again.  Once I decided that, the voice in my head shut up and I started hitting my lines.  I got a great quote Mike Petrin gave  to another player on our card during the DUI.  "Do you ever think about %$#@ing or do you just %$#@???  Just %$#@!".

I also feel that those who think they know the most about any subject are those just above novice.  I do include myself in this one!  When you first start out at something you gain so much knowledge so fast.  You get excited and want to share all this "new" knowledge.  I also find that trying to teach even if especially if I am not solid on the subject is when I learn the most as it forces me to figure out why I do what I do.  I also find if I correct something in someone it will force me to practice what I preach as the "student" will happily correct me when they see me doing something I recently corrected on them.  The unfortunate think is until we gain enough experience we don’t know what is right and wrong and self-correction fades into excuses as you pass that initial novice stage.  It is when you finally accept that you aren’t quite as good as you thought you were that you can see the excuses for what they have become.  I know that was me not as long ago as I would like.

When I used to captain APA pool teams I would have the lower rated players on my team try to call a coach on me as often as possible so that they could discuss strategy.  This helped them think through a game without playing giving them some experience by proxy as they were still part of the game and occasionally I would get advice from some newer players that made me rethink how I would approach certain shots.  This goes back to confidence in your game.  At that point I had confidence in my mechanics and overall my ability to play the shot at hand.  When I was coached I was able to rethink things objectively and continue without that voice saying I “think this is right…  yeah?  This is right?”.  As a lower rated disc golfer at the moment, I have have that voice in my head too often when I am not where I planned on being or if I just shot a double on the last hole.  As I gain more and more experience and experience doing it right more and more, the more I have the ability to “Just %$#@”. (Thank You Mike !)  When I get to that space I am able to play with strategy and fail without the frustration allowing me to learn from those mistakes instead of letting them drag me down.  I still have  a lot to learn and need to continue to seek advice from whomever and wherever I can get it and not allow myself to start with excuses again.  Sometimes even bad advice can teach you something.  Sometimes it reinforces your confidence in why you do what you do as I learned from my time in APA.
Thanks,
Chris Portwood
Technology Team
PDGA# 55595

Loomis

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Re: Disc Golf IQ
« Reply #23 on: April 09, 2013, 03:16:14 PM »
So there is really no right or wrong way to practice? And there is really no right or wrong technique? Just go with what works?

coops

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Re: Disc Golf IQ
« Reply #24 on: April 09, 2013, 03:24:36 PM »
So there is really no right or wrong way to practice? And there is really no right or wrong technique? Just go with what works?

False.

I mean, if it works, then I think in this sense it must be right. But, on the other hand, if it doesn't work then it either may be right or may be wrong.

Loomis

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Re: Disc Golf IQ
« Reply #25 on: April 09, 2013, 03:31:50 PM »
So where, or who, do you turn to for advice on finding the right direction?

The Bird Father

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Re: Disc Golf IQ
« Reply #26 on: April 09, 2013, 03:41:41 PM »
So where, or who, do you turn to for advice on finding the right direction?


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Loomis

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Re: Disc Golf IQ
« Reply #27 on: April 09, 2013, 03:44:14 PM »
That should be a shirt.

phisherman_77

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Re: Disc Golf IQ
« Reply #28 on: April 09, 2013, 03:44:51 PM »
It is.  Anthony Puryear has one.

coops

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Re: Disc Golf IQ
« Reply #29 on: April 09, 2013, 03:50:36 PM »
So where, or who, do you turn to for advice on finding the right direction?

Everyone and no one. You need to find what is right for you. Oft you can find that from tidbits present in everyone's game. I remember when I was a newer player that I used to study how Hemme putted. I didn't try to putt like him, but I did try to mimic his tenacity. I've also learned from watching a video of Feldberg that spin putting is a reactionary process and can't be thought of as quite as mechanical and formulaic as pitch putting. Arturo and EMac taught me the importance of putting a bit nose up. I taught myself and grip and a stance that were comfortable and repeatable.

You have to open to learning all things from everyone and nothing from no one.

If you are talking about driving I think there are several parallels but I would say the most important thing is to not try to mimic someone with a vastly different body type than yourself. If I tried to copy Will or Ricky or any of those other tall, lanky, long-armed people I would be in a world of hurt. If I tried to throw like Avery high across the chest I'm sure I'd tear something. But, on the other hand, if I try to learn from Nate Doss or Dave Feldberg, two pros with more average features, I may have much more success.